Denver (or Leaving the Nest)

It’s been an interesting Spring semester.  We ended up having another lock-down the first week of March as more insanity ensued outside the school walls. Spring break came and went bringing with it a southern snow storm (i.e., no accumulation).  We began the countdown to state testing a few weeks ago; next Monday there will be exactly 10 days left.

On April 4th, we found out there was a lot of money left from our School Improvement Grant and were encouraged to find conferences and professional development opportunities before the money disappears at the end of June.  So, of course, I applied to go to the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics Annual Conference which, at that point, had a start date less than two weeks from then.  Monday at 5pm, I found out I was approved to come.  Then today, winter storm Yogi gave me a nice relaxing day at the airport to read.

So, I’m in Denver and missing my wife and son terribly.  But since this is a math blog, we’ll get back to that.  This is my first time leaving my students with a substitute, since when my son was born in the fall, my students were split among the other two Algebra teachers.  I struggled a lot in trying to figure out what to leave for them to do while I was gone because I’ve been a student in a room with a sub before, and great distance weakens authority greatly, right? (Thanks, high school history!)  The last thing in our curriculum before the state testing is the probability unit, so I created these two worksheets to guide them through a project on experimental vs. theoretical probability.



They’re a little leading, but I wanted to make sure they would work without me having to press them in person.  I’m kind of nervous about leaving dice with the sub.  I can imagine scores of things that could go wrong.  To make myself feel a little bit better, I left a message on the board at the front of the room that just said,

I trust you

<3 BC

We’ll see what’s waiting for me when I get back.

::

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